Fox Island Garden Club

Gardening Tip of the Month
By Linda Dodds

September Tip of the Month
Friday, September 01, 2017
So August was a HOT and DRY month which we donít normally have in such abundance. I finally had enough cucumbers so I could start making pickles but because only two of my dill plants grew from seed, I have had to purchase a few bunches of dill and then start pickling. I believe I already gave you my Aunt Olgaís dill pickle recipe last year so I wonít be doing it again this year. However, I also have been making mulled fig and mulled blackberry vinegars along with blackberry cordial this year too. The blackberry cordial is made by taking a quart of blackberries and infusing them with 1 cup of sugar and then adding one qt.of 100 proof vodka. Shake the mixture once a week for up to 2 months. Strain the liquid through a metal sieve and then through a coffee filter to remove the fruit. Pour into pretty bottles. Drink as a cordial or use to flavor lemonade or iced tea or even ice cream. Thanks, Abby Schofield for sharing this recipe!

I donít know about other gardeners, but I have had a fantastic crop of French green beans, potatoes, Swiss chard, beets, basil and cucumbers. I picked 50 cukes from about 10 plants the other evening and then spent the rest of the night making pickles.

To keep annual baskets looking their best, trim the ends to stimulate new growth and then give them a good drink of liquid fish fertilizer or compost tea. Be sure to water the plants well before fertilizing them so that the nutrients will be absorbed throughout the whole pot and not just run along the side of the pot. Water lawns and shrubs less often, but when you do water, water deeply. This will encourage roots to stretch themselves as far as possible into the soil. If you have a lot of run off when you water, stop watering for a bit and give the soil a chance to absorb water and then continue to water until an empty tuna can has 1 inch of water in it. One inch is enough to keep your lawn looking great for a whole week as long as it is not just running off and being wasted.

Enjoy pickling, canning, freezing and dehydrating through Sept and into October.

August Garden Tip of the Month
Tuesday, August 01, 2017
Instead of doing a lot of canning This August, you may realize that your produce has not grown or produced as it has in the previous last few years. I think the cold and wet spring kept a lot of us from planting at the usual times or the vegetable seeds did not have the needed heat to sprout or grow as fast as usual. I planted many seeds that never germinated so had to reseed later on in early summer. However this first week of August could change all that as itís predicted we may see over 100 degrees in some areas. Beans should be producing like gang busters soon if not already and tomato plants should be ripening soon. Keep watering less frequently but deeper than you may have been doing. Otherwise in case we should have water shortages, the roots will not have grown down deep enough to search for moisture and will be more susceptible to stress.

August is when I usually start making my flavored vinegars and I want to share with you my favorite discovery of a vinegar I experimented with and made last year. However I may not be able to pick the ripe fruit until mid or late August. After making, blueberry basil, raspberry, mulled blackberry and herb vinegars I decided to try and use up my abundance of figs off my tree. And it was delicious and is now my favorite.

Here is my recipe for fig vinegar which works for most other kinds also.

Fig vinegar

1 qt ripe washed and stemmed figs
5 cups white wine vinegar, divided

Place figs in a large glass bowl. With a potato masher crush figs with 1 cup of white wine vinegar. Add remaining vinegar, stirring to combine. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and store in a dark cool place 70-75* for 3-4 weeks, stirring every 2-3 days. Taste weekly until desired strength is achieved.

Prepare hot water canner jars and lids.

Line a strainer with several layers of cheese cloth and place over a large stainless steel saucepan. Strain vinegar without squeezing cheesecloth. Discard cheesecloth and residue. Place saucepan over medium heat and heat vinegar to 180*F.
Ladle hot vinegar into hot jars leaving ľ inch headspace. Wipe jar rim and center lid on jar. Screw band down until resistance is met, then increase to fingertip tight.
Place jars in canner, ensuring that jars are completely covered with water. Place canner lid on pot, bring water to a boil and process for 10 minutes. Remover canner lid and let jars remain in the pot for 5 minutes before removing the jars to cool and store.

I also tried some fig vinegar with the addition to the crushed fig and vinegar mixture of 2 cinnamon sticks broken in pieces, 1 tbls. each of whole cloves and allspice. It was also delicious!

July Garden Tip of the Month
Saturday, July 01, 2017
May and most of June just didnít give us any indication that Summer was right around the corner until around June 23 when the temperature started to soar. It was a relief to see that the sun still could heat our earth but it sure didnít do it gradually or gracefully. In case you havenít already been set on a watering schedule, the weekend scorcher should have made you aware that itís time to set it up. Lawns seem to the most water but watering every day does not keep your lawn green and healthy. Lawns only need about 1 inch of water a week so instead of just sprinkling daily, give your lawn a good soaking at one time. The grass roots will grow deeper looking for water and will be in a much better condition to fight off weeds and grow lush and green.

To test to see how long it takes to water to one inch in depth, try this very uncomplicated process. Place empty cans the size of tuna cans around your lawn where different sprinkler heads are wateringÖturn on your sprinkler and check to see how long it takes to water one inch deep in each location. You may need to adjust your sprinkler to cover all areas equally.

Watering potted plants will take more time as the pots will dry out much faster than plants planted directly in the garden. Flowers in pots need to be deadheaded once a week to keep them blooming. Otherwise they figure they have done their job in producing seeds for the next generation and decide to just grow old and retire since their work is done. Keep them young and healthy by removing spent flowers, adding fertilizer routinely and they will keep looking fresh and lovely. Think of it as a beauty treatment for your flowering pots.

Keep your vegetables producing by picking them as soon as they are ready. Hopefully you staggered the seeds for leafy vegetables so you will have a fresh supply all summer. Even beans, carrots and herbs such as basil and parsley can be reseeded occasionally.

I just emailed a question regarding humming birds to a site to get some information on beak rot. I had a hummingbird that stayed at my feeder, almost living there and was gaining weight so fast, I could see the difference almost daily. He had what I thought at first was an unusually long beak but then I realized that the end of it was floppy. I thought maybe something was stuck on his beak or his tongue was too long. He rocked back and forth on the feeder rest and I was able to get within a foot or two from him before he would fly off. I thought if I could capture him or her, I could take it to a vet but I was out weeding the other day and found him dead. His beak was definitely rotting away so I cleaned out my feeders and rinsed them with hydrogen peroxide.

Thanks and happy Summer gardening!


June Garden Tip of the Month
Thursday, June 01, 2017
The plants and seeds that do best in warm weather can safely be planted this month. That list includes tomatoes, squash, beans, corn, cucumbers, basil, eggplant and peppers. Bedding plants are best for tomato, eggplant and peppers as they take a while to mature and produce before the season is over. As I try to be as organic as possible in my gardening, I do not use any chemicals with my vegetable starts. When planting tomatoes, I add a handful of alfalfa meal into each hole, mix it in with home processed compost and then plant them and water well. Seeds for squash, beans, corn and cucumbers sprout readily in the warmer weather. Basil can be planted either by seed or small plants. Most of the veggies get compost and fish fertilizer except for peas and beans which are nitrogen fixers and require nothing except compost. They make a great soil additive as even their roots contain nitrogen and they continue to add nitrogen to the soil even for the next year.

Corn uses a lot of nitrogen to grow and produce while pole beans need good support so planting them next to each other is a win - win situation. There is one problem though and that is that raccoons love corn and will destroy the stalks along with the corn and beans just about the time the corn is ready to pick. There is an app for that! It's call growing cucumber plants around and within the corn plants. Those little corn thieves hate the prickly leaves on the cucumbers and will stay away from them which gives you the opportunity to actually salvage the stalks for Halloween as well as enjoy the corn.

Never plant nightshade plants of tomato or potatoes in the same place as either of them were grown the previous year. It helps to do a yearly drawing of which vegetable was planted where in the garden. Otherwise it is hard to wait until the next year and just try to guess where they were grown. The cause of the great potato famine in Ireland was caused by growing the same crop over and over in the same spot. The blight spread to epic proportions forcing many of their citizens to emigrate to the US rather than starve to death.

Most annual flowers can also be added to your garden to punch up your yard with sizzling color. Petunias, inpatients, lobelia, fuchsias and begonias are in this group. Give any of these plants a good soaking before removing them from their pots and planting them. Usually potting soil tends to be very porous and will let the water run right through and around newly planted plants so the soaking really gets them off to a good start. Osmocote fertilizer granules are great to add to your plantings along with a solution of Alaska fish fertilizer. The fish fertilizer gives instant nutrition and the Osmocote is a slow release granular fertilizer that continues to feed the plants for several months. Don't forget to deadhead the faded blossoms to not only keep plantings looking neat but also to encourage new blossoms.

Water deeply during the summer months but certainly not daily. Keep pulling weeds, use up produce before it flowers go goes to waste and enjoy the lovely weather.

March Garden Tip of the Month
Wednesday, March 01, 2017
This year the traditional ĎMarch comes in Like a Lion and Goes out Like a Lamb Ďis being replaced by ĎOrange is the new Blackí. That seems to have been the theme of this yearís NW Flower and Garden show in Seattle. Several of the display gardens not only incorporated edibles in the landscape but also vibrant displays of the color orange. The hardscape included brightly colored orange pillows and even orange tables. Along with the garden art that included lots of orange hues made the gardens really pop. I was a little disappointed though in the gardens as there were no large waterfall cascading gardens nor new varieties of that must have plant.

However the ones they did have on display were a lot more urban and suburban friendly with edible groundcovers and tons of fragrant blooming plants and flowers. Itís those fragrances that bring me back every year along with the canned bird songs playing.

You may want to incorporate edibles into your own gardens instead of using just a few shrubs and trees and having all that mulch and bark covering your garden beds. Instead of pulling out weeds all summer, it would be much nicer to cut some herbs, lettuces, peas and carrots to add to your meals.

March is the traditional month to plant and prune roses. Beware of sales on roses that are not marked and known varieties to our area. There are books on the care and growing needs of roses and which are climbers, blight resistant, the color or very fragrant. And today with the popular ĎGoogle ití phrase, do some research first so you know which roses to choose and how to plant and care for them.

Iím sure Iím not alone in feeling overwhelmed with the flowering weeds spreading all over our grounds. Just think of pulling them as free exercise. Besides the fact that pulling them before they flower and reseed as a time saver for this summer when you can enjoy putting on an apron, big flouncy skirt, high heels and a big hat for clipping bouquets. Ha ha haÖthat just never happens except in our dreams! Now my side is aching from laughing so hard.

Happy almost Spring.

February 2017 Garden Tip of the Month
Wednesday, February 01, 2017
Get out your calendars and mark February 22 Ė 26 for the Northwest Flower and Garden Show at the Seattle Convention Center. This year promises to be even more exciting as it not only features garden seminars, display gardens and tons of garden supply and related products for sale but also this year features a display of handcrafted floral designed cakes.

I know that a trip to Seattle may seem daunting to many of you who donít do well in traffic, but just think how lucky we are to live as close to Seattle as we are. The event is the largest gardening event west of Philadelphia and not only draws people from Alaska and Vancouver, Canada to San Francisco and all the states east of us. There are over 100 educational gardening seminars demonstration gardens and a vintage market place as well as everything gardening related items for sale.

Itís a great place to look for ideas that you can reproduce in your own yard, see the newest shrubs and flowers and purchase seeds and plants. Itís a must for most garden clubs and just garden lovers.

I usually start my edible pea pods and tomato plants in mid to end of February so I enjoy shopping for the seeds I may not have saved from the previous year. If you look at the seed packages for tomatoes, they usually tell you whether the seeds are from Heirloom or hybrid plants. Remember that hybrids most likely will not produce the same tomato as the variety that you have saved from the previous yearís crop.

February is a good time to start the Great War on Weeds. Choose a fairly sunny day and focus on pulling out even a few of the shot weed and other flowering weeds that produce millions of seeds. Even if itís only for a few minutes at a time, you will be saving hours of summer weeding. And reallyÖisnít summer meant to be enjoyed instead of pulling weeds all day long.

Roses can be pruned in late February and usually so can hydrangeas. But donít be too severe in your pruning in case we should get hit with a real cold snap for the end of the month and into March.

January Tip of the Month
Sunday, January 01, 2017
Happy 2017 Gardening year!
Most of January tips I have written throughout the years, include suggestions for making a garden plan in January by reviewing what you liked or disliked about your previous gardening experience.
This year I have decided to just focus on making the remaining winter months a more pleasant place for visitors, which would be birds. And most people do not want to have bird seeds scattered all over their yards and thus encouraging rats, mice and raccoons to stop seeing your home as their local restaurant.
Many of those problems can be attributed to using birdseed that is scattered by the birds as they throw out most of the seeds and focus on the black oil sunflower seeds. I just use the sunflower seeds exclusively at the feeders and fill my suet feeders with something really tasty to the birds. In fact, your homemade version of suet can be so delicious, the birds stick their beaks up at prepackaged store bought suet until they realize youíre not feeling so inclined to be their personal chef. This is an easy recipe to experiment with and make any variations to within reason. Iíll occasionally add crushed unsalted peanuts or use different type of, sitting in the cupboard too long, rye, rice or whole wheat flours or different kinds of cereal. Just as long as it can hold a shape and not leek out of the suet cages itís worth experimenting.
Homemade Bird Suet
1 cup of lard
1 cup crunchy peanut butter
1/3 cup sugar
2 cups quick cooking oats
2 cups cornmeal
1 cup flour
1 cup birdseed
Melt lard and peanut butter. Add sugar to the melted mix. Combine remaining ingredients and form into blocks* and then freeze.
* I save out the firmer of the old used store purchased suet containers and clean them up to store the suet in the freezer. You can easily double the recipe but just remember you will need a lot of plastic forms.

Happy 2017 Gardening year!


December Garden Tip of the Month
Thursday, December 01, 2016
First of all I want to apologize to all of you for some incorrect info I gave you in last monthís column. Nita Bjork mentioned to me that I had erroneously stated that to preserve some of the gorgeous fall leaves, to just iron them between sheets of waxed paper and then dry them between pages in a book. It actually should have stated to press the leaves dry first and then preserve them wax paper. I just donít know what I was thinking at te time I wrote that.

Now on to Decemberís suggestions. Instead of spending all your hard earned money buying a holiday wreath to grace your front door, why not make your own. Wire wreath forms can be purchased at any craft store and with our abundance of greenery can be turned into a stunning one of a kind holiday decoration. There most likely are tons of different greeneries growing in your garden, just there for the picking. Red twig dogwood bundled in small bunches are a great addition for adding color. We are lucky to live where the sometimes hard to control holly shrubs can also benefit from being trimmed and added to the form. Even salal, dried lavender, bay leaves, pine branches, cones, cedar and fir branches and anything else that is evergreen. You can add Juniper, Camellia branches and even bare branches that have an interesting twist to them to your wreath. Wire them in small bunches and then add to fill in any space. Let your imagination soar and see what you create.

Try to keep leaves off your lawn by raking them up and either add them to your compost pile or scatter them directly on vegetable beds to keep rain from washing away the soil.

I donít know what to expect this year in the way of cold weather. I have red and white azaleas that have grown together and look like one plant with red and white flowers bloomingÖright now instead of waiting until spring. Never the less, in case it really gets nasty and cold, I have cut back the leaves on my banana trees and covered the plants with insulation and then plastic covering the whole thing. I extended the plastic way over the root zone as the Musa Bajoo banana cannot tolerate to sit in an over wet area. I still need to wrap insulation around my Meyer lemon tree however, even though it is on a covered deck. With all the lemons on it in the process of ripening, I would hate to lose this yearís crop.

Have a lovely Christmas and a wonderful rest before the next gardening year begins.

November Garden Tip of the Month
Tuesday, November 01, 2016
Fall finally arrived in mid October with winds and rain knocking off the beautiful
red and golden leaves. What a gorgeous site we have had with all the fall foliage on the many sunny October days. I have been stopping my car whenever I see some especially bright and interesting leaves and taking them home to preserve them.

It's an easy project to accomplish by ironing the leaves between two pieces of wax paper. Once the wax starts to melt, remove the leaves from the wax paper and press them between the pages of a phone book to dry. I put a small television or several heavy books on top of the phone book and will soon remove the leaves to use as decorations on my Thanksgiving table. According to Juanita Bjork who taught me the art of leaf preserving, the leaves should stay supple and colorful for several years.

If you didn't fertilize your lawn with an organic fertilizer in Oct. then fertilize it with a fall fertilizer the end of November. It is no longer warm enough for an organic fertilizer to work with these chilly November days but the slow working organic fertilizer will stimulate early spring growing root growth for next year.

There is still time to plant spring blooming bulbs of daffodils and tulips as well as garlic. Just choose hard and healthy looking bulbs.

Keep leaves raked up and toss them around plantings to protect the soil around them from washing away in the heavy winter rains. And keep leaves raked up over lawns so the grass won't be smothered. Then going inside and have a hot toddy and watch a gardening program.

October Gardening Tip of The Month
Saturday, October 01, 2016
If you are lucky enough to have fruit trees of a producing age, you most likely have enjoyed an abundance of fruit this year. I have never seen so many grapes, pears, apples, figs, plums and Asian pears as I have this summer and early fall. I have given away sacks of fruit to friends and family and have been dehydrating a lot of it too as well as eating a lot of fresh fruit everyday for a month or more. My cup runneth over with...juice! The local wild blackberries that I picked and also my figs were each mashed, mulling spices added and then put in jars with apple cider vinegar to make my own fruit flavored vinegar. I thought that cooking down the vinegar once the fruit was removed would make it thick similar to balsamic vinegar.... but it really didn't so my project this winter is to look up recipes for turning the vinegar into a balsamic product. Until I perfect the recipe to my satisfaction, I'll just enjoy the products that my family gave me during my brother Paul's and my August trip to Finland and Italy.

I don't know exactly what I was expecting when we were in Finland but it certainly wasn't many of the same native shrubs and trees that grow here in Washington. And we were bordering the outskirts to the Arctic Circle where we visited. In the Italian Alps, we again found a lot of Washington native trees such as fir, manzanita and alders. Just the food was different and delicious to boot.

Now is your opportunity to start cleaning your yard of dried annuals, perennials and other summer blooming plants. It's a good time to cut back hedges and do general maintenance. The only planting to finish this month is seeding or planting winter growing vegetables such as beets, cabbage and Brussels sprouts . Clearing out a lot of dying and used up plants helps to expose winter hiding places for slugs and other unwanted pests. And don't forget to compost rotting fruit where rats, deer and raccoons can't get it. Rake fall leaves and use them to cover and protect the soil in your garden beds. Plant spring blooming bulbs as soon as you see them for sale in your local nursery areas for your best bet for growing healthy plants for next spring. Always check to be sure all bulbs are healthy and not soft and squishy or you will just be wasting your time digging holes and planting a bulb that won't survive the winter. And while you are out working in the garden, you might want to fertilize lawns with a fall and winter fertilizer. The slow dissolving fertilizer will really start to work fertilizing the lawn in early spring after soaking in all winter.

The last chore to share with you, is to make a drawing of your vegetable bed, label it with this years date and keep it in a place where you will remember to find it. Example would be a file for '2016 garden' folder and use it to locate where you planted each variety of vegetable and then rotate your next years crop to a different location. That way, any spores that may spread disease will not be where it's family was located the previous year. I always plant tomatoes where a high nitrogen producing plant such as beans or peas were planted the year before. For Real Estate the saying is location, location, location but for gardening it's rotation, rotation, rotation.